Category: Uncategorized

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Columbia City of Women to Honor New Class of Leaders

by WREN Staff on Mar 5, 2020

Join us on International Women’s Day as we reveal eight new women as the 2020 class of Columbia City of Women honorees. On March 31, 2019, Former First Lady of South Carolina Rachel Hodges, WREN, and Historic Columbia introduced Columbia City of Women, a very special initiative to put women in their (rightful) place —

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Meet Kayla

by WREN Staff on Feb 21, 2020

  Our nest is getting bigger! Meet WREN’s newest staff member and Network Engagement Manager, Kayla Mallet. 1. Where are you from?  The Mighty Metropolis of Manning, South Carolina – Clarendon County. 2. What did you do before coming to WREN? Prior to joining this team, I coordinated a statewide panel of citizens who were

Leadership and Civic Engagement, News, Uncategorized

2020: Looking Ahead

by Wren Staff on Jan 8, 2020

South Carolina runs on 2 year legislative cycles and 2020 marks the beginning of the second year. The first day of session will begin on Tuesday, January 14, 2020. Here are a few tips to prepare for this session:   1. Download the SC Legislature App   This mobile app makes staying connected during the

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Meet Chloe

by Wren Team on Dec 13, 2019

1. Where are you from? Originally, I was born in Boulder, Colorado, but I’ve lived in Charleston, South Carolina since I was two. I like Columbia more than Charleston, which is a very unpopular opinion.   2. What did you do previously before coming to WREN? Before this position, I was at South Carolina Farm

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Data Reveal Multiple Barriers to Gender Justice in South Carolina

by Wren Staff on Dec 12, 2019

In collaboration with the National Women’s Law Center, WREN released a report that reveals multiple barriers to gender justice. As a result of a history of discriminatory practices, women in South Carolina face disparities based on race, gender, sexual orientation, and gender identity.  This report focuses on a host of issues that illustrate the barriers

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Get outraged. Then get organized.

by Ann Warner on Oct 22, 2019

BREAKING: 6-week abortion ban receives favorable report in subcommittee vote Today the Senate Medical Affairs subcommittee voted to move forward a six-week abortion ban with no exceptions for rape or incest.  This vote demonstrates a profound disrespect for the health and safety of South Carolinians, and total disregard for the countless objections raised by doctors,

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Black Women in South Carolina Deserve Equal Pay

by Elected Black Women, SC General Assembly on Aug 22, 2019

Today, August 22, marks Black Women’s Equal Pay Day. Far from a celebration, this day represents how far Black women nationwide had to work into 2019 to match what white, non-Hispanic men earned in 2018. Nationally, Black women working full-time, year-round earned 61 cents for every dollar earned by white men working full-time, year-round. This

Advocate Stories, Uncategorized

Seven Questions with Damilola

by WREN Staff on Oct 10, 2018

Our nest is getting bigger! Meet WREN’s newest staff member and Policy Assistant, Damilola Ajisegiri. 1. Where are you from? I was born in Nigeria but grew up in Snellville, GA. I received my undergraduate degree from the University of Georgia in Psychology & a minor in Women Studies. I then moved to South Carolina

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Remembering Sarah Leverette

by Brandi Parrish Ellison on Aug 31, 2018

We all have people in our lives that we look to for inspiration, guidance, and gusto. People who move us to be better people, not just for ourselves, but better for others. Sarah Leverette was this for me and countless other women. Sarah had tenacity. She was once quoted saying, “I didn’t feel like I

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Demand More for Black Women

by Sarah Nichols on Aug 30, 2018

August 7th was Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, which means that a black woman would have to work more than 200 additional days to make the same amount of money a white man makes in a year. And August 7th is certainly a significant, symbolic representation of the inequities that still exist for black women